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Dojo gives Dawson Creek a traditional karate experience with a competitive edge

One karate school to emerge from the closure of Tanshin is The Dojo, run by Mike Deleurme and Tracy Short. “I have confidence (Deleurme and Short) will have a great dojo and do interesting things.
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Deleurme hopes to bring something a little different to the community from the other Dojos. Following Dufour’s retirement, Deleurme took some time to train at home and decide what he wanted to do gong forward.

One karate school to emerge from the closure of Tanshin is The Dojo, run by Mike Deleurme and Tracy Short.

“I have confidence (Deleurme and Short) will have a great dojo and do interesting things. Mike’s passion is competing and giving students the opportunity to do so,” Bill Dufour said.

Deleurme hopes to bring something a little different to the community from the other dojos. Following Dufour’s retirement, Deleurme took some time to train at home and decide what he wanted to do going forward.

“Things moved really fast, but we’re excited to start this and give people a traditional kyokushin karate experience,” Deleurme said.

He and Short hope to train students in the traditional lifestyle parts of the art-form, while also allowing them a chance to compete and spar against each other and in competitions.  

“I want us to be a place for people to come and have a traditional experience, but also to come to train and fight. I want karate to be a lifestyle for our members, not something you try and quit after two years,” Deleurme said.

He knows all about coming back to the art after a time away. After growing up being a part of a Shodokan Karate dojo in lower-mainland B.C., and competing at a high level for a number of years, Deleurme took a break from karate when he moved to Dawson Creek for work in 1997. After a number of years away, and inspired by his then five-year-old child, Deleurme got back into karate and began training with Dufour. Now, he, his two children, and partner Short are hoping to bring that lifelong passion of karate to others.

“You may fall out of it a couple times, but you never quite quit, it always stays with you. It’s about having a balance in your life, building confidence and strength within yourself, and being a part of something,” Deleurme said.

For Deleurme and his family, it’s been a long six months away from training with other people together at a gym.

“I miss the people. You build a lot of camaraderie on those matts. I’m very excited to get back on the matts with both familiar and new faces, to get started, and do something good for the community of Dawson Creek,” Deleurme said.