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Heat Dome: Here are the new heat records set in the B.C. Peace during the June heatwave

There were six consecutive daily heat records broken in Fort St. John and Dawson during the unprecedented heatwave over the last week.
 

There were six consecutive daily maximum temperature records broken in Fort St. John and Dawson Creek during the unprecedented heatwave over the last week.

Here are the new records, according to data from Environment Canada:

Friday, June 25

Dawson Creek - 31.2

Fort St. John - 31.2 (old record of 28.3 set in 1967)

Saturday, June 26

Dawson Creek - 32.8 (old record of 31.7 set in 1928)

Fort St. John - 31.8 (old record of 31.7 in 1928)

Sunday, June 27

Dawson Creek - 36.1 (old record of 28.2 set in 2000)

Fort St. John - 35.1 (old record of 30.0 set in 1928)

Monday, June 28

Dawson Creek - 38.1 (old record of 27.8 set in 2015)

Fort St. John - 36.3 (old record of 27.9 set in 2015)

Tuesday, June 29

Dawson Creek - 38.9 (old record of 30.2 set in 2015)

Fort St. John - 38.1 (old record of 30.5 set in 2015)

Dawson Creek also set a new maximum humidex of 45 degrees on this day.

Fort St. John also set a new maximum humidex of 42 degrees on this day.

Wednesday, June 30

Dawson Creek - 34.9 (old record of 27.4 set in 2008)

Fort St. John - 35.1 (old record of 27.2 set in 1942)

Dawson Creek also set a new maximum humidex of 42 degrees on this day.



Though temperatures have dropped dramatically since Wednesday evening, a heat warning remains in effect for the B.C. Peace. 

Environment Canada says daytime highs will range up to near 30 degrees combined with overnight lows near 14 degrees.

Drink plenty of water even before you feel thirsty and stay in a cool place.

Check on older family, friends and neighbours. Make sure they are cool and drinking water

Never leave people or pets inside a parked vehicle.

Watch for the symptoms of heat illness: dizziness/fainting; nausea/vomiting; rapid breathing and heartbeat; extreme thirst; decreased urination with unusually dark urine.

Outdoor workers should take regularly scheduled breaks in a cool place.



On Wednesday, the B.C. Coroners Service said there had been at least 486 sudden and unexpected deaths reported across the province since June 25.

“It is believed likely that the significant increase in deaths reported is attributable to the extreme weather B.C. has experienced and continues to impact many parts of our province,” Chief Coroner Lisa Lapointe said.

B.C. Emergency Health Services said there were 41 heat-related calls received in June to date within the Northern Health region.

Eight of those were in the Peace: four in Fort St. John, two in Dawson Creek, one in Tumbler Ridge, and one in Chetwynd.


Email Managing Editor Matt Preprost at editor@ahnfsj.ca