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God of Carnage play brings cunning linguists to stage September 22-24

Verbal sparring turns to screaming, then to something else entirely. Cigars. Rum. Machetes. Cobbler. A hot new drug, Antril. Thump guns. Gangs.
Michael Novak, left, disgusts house guests Annette and Alan Raleigh with racist thoughts on life.
Kevin Smith, left, playing Michael Novak, disgusts his house guests Annette and Alan Raleigh with his frank and sometimes racist thoughts on life.

Stage North is going to a deity for their first production of the year—The God of Carnage.

The 2009 Tony award-winning play is set to kick off what is already Stage North’s most utterly insane year yet.

The play concerns a pair of parents who meet to discuss a fight of their children. Verbal sparring turns to screaming, then to something else entirely. Cigars. Rum. Machetes. Cobbler. A hot new drug, Antril. Thump guns. Gangs. Warning, the play contains some wretchedly strong language and moments. 

Director Jesse McCallum says its all about the actors. He said his wish as a director to have a cast of four strong performers has been met and then some. 

“It’s very rare you get a strong ensemble cast who build off their co-stars and challenge each others to bring their best performances every day. That’s what we have here on Carnage.”

Rob Brown, south of the river actor who plays lawyer/super-dad Alan Raleigh, agrees about the live nature of rehearsals thus far. 

He says it’s important to distance the play both from other incarnations of the Tony award winning script, and the Roman Polanski film version filled with Oscar winners.

“You can have hackasaurus performances of plays and previous incarnations of productions we have all seen before, like the whip-cracking quartermaster of a slave ship, or actors can create something new as you build characters, situations and great moments within the real exploration of rehearsal, lines, set, script, and the hot aspect of these live dates coming up.” 

Producer Steven McLean said the theatre company is driven by passion. 

“Every show is put on by volunteers who sacrifice hundreds of hours of free time, people who spend almost every night building, designing, memorizing material."

McCallum agrees. 

“Actors and crew put so much time putting on a show to entertain and get very little out of it,” he said.

“I believe the best thanks our community can give volunteers would be to buy a ticket to see their hard work.”

God of Carnage rolls out Sept 22, 23, 24 at the Evangel Chapel in Fort St. John.

 

editor@dcdn.ca