Bat house building workshop in DC

The Timberline Trail and Nature Club held a bat house building workshop on Saturday October 26 at McQueen’s Slough.

Bat enthusiasts around BC are celebrating and supporting bats by participating in International Bat Week (October 24-31). 

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Bat Week is all about appreciating these amazing animals and their benefits, from eating insects to pollinating the agave plant used to make tequila.  

Attend a bat talk, help restore a wetland, visit a roost site, prepare your bat house for next spring. There are many ways to participate and the Peace Region has been getting organized.

“Bats in BC help control agricultural and forest pests, as well as mosquitoes in our yards - but now bats need our help. The conservation of bats in BC has always been important, since over half the species in this province are considered at risk,” says Mandy Kellner, Coordinator for the BC Community Bat Program.

“With the continuing spread of White-nose Syndrome in Washington State, bat conservation is more important than ever.” 

White-nose Syndrome (WNS) is a disease caused by an introduced fungus, first detected in North America in a cave in New York in 2006. Since it was discovered, it has spread to 33 states and 7 provinces in North America, decimating bat populations along the way. 

“Luckily, WNS is not yet in BC,” continues Kellner. 

“But we are preparing for its arrival by raising awareness about bats, working with landowners who have bats in buildings, enhancing bat habitat, and monitoring populations.”

Monitoring for WNS in BC will continue this winter, with Community Bat Programs requesting reports of dead bats or sightings of winter bat activity starting November 1. 

You can report sightings at www.bcbats.ca, Peace@bcbats.ca, or 1-855-922-2287 (ext. 18).

Myotis lucifugus, Little Brown Myotis: the Little Brown Myotis is common and widespread across BC but endangered in Canada, and to expected to decline in BC due to WNS. 

In partnership with the BC Ministry of Environment, and funded by the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation, Forest Enhancement Society of BC, Habitat Stewardship Program, and the Timberline Trail and Nature Club the BC Community Bat Program provides information about bats in buildings, conducts site visits to advise landowners on managing bats in buildings, coordinates the Annual Bat Count, and offers educational programs. 

Take a moment to learn about the many ways bats contribute to our lives, and what you can do locally for bats, at www.batweek.org or through the BC Community Bat Program at www.bcbats.ca.

To find out more about the BC Community Bat Program, BatWeek activities, and options for helping local bat populations, visit www.bcbats.ca or call or 1-855-922-2287.

reporter@dcdn.ca

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